How to write a good resume

There are many resume writing guides out there and most professionals understand the basic concept and purpose of a resume. The information below is focused on how to make your resume as effective as possible and how to avoid common mistakes.

General Do’s and Don’ts

  • Avoid writing a function resume.
    Unless you are applying for a consulting position or have large gaps in work history, it is rarely beneficial to use such a format.
  • 1 page resume is not necessarily the best solution.
    For experienced professionals and if you plan on working with a recruiter, we strongly recommend that you use 2-3 pages. This will give you enough space to explain your skills and work history in sufficient detail without compromising a hiring manager’s understanding of your expertise and capabilities. However, try not to exceed 3 pages. You don’t want to lose a hiring manager’s attention.
  • Be more descriptive about your recent work history
    Emphasize the last 5 years. Allocate less space to experience that is more than 5 years old unless it is particularly relevant to the position that you are seeking or applying for.
  • Tailor your resume to the job description.
    Make sure to highlight skills and experience that is relevant to the job description and/or the position that you are pursuing.
  • Don’t assume that the hiring manager will interpret the content
    Be specific and detailed as it will reduce room for speculation and faulty conclusions on the part of the reader.

Guidelines for writing a technical resume and what it should include

  • Name, contact information and visa status (if applicable)
  • Introductory Statement
    • A brief synopsis of who you are (in terms of profession, capability and personality) and/or what you are looking for.
    • Try to keep it to 1 or 2 sentences.
  • Summary of Qualifications
    • This section should include a handful of statements that reflect key areas from your experience and training that are also strong requirements for the job position.
  • Technical Summary
    • List your technical skills and categorize them in order of your strongest skills first. You can also include the number of years you have used a particular technology.
  • Experience/Work History
    • Make sure to include dates of employment (for every employer), job title, name of employer and city/country of employment. Follow it with a more descriptive summary of responsibilities, achievements and key duties.
    • Use this section of the resume to explain in detail the work that you did and which technologies/tools you used to do it. There should be references to all technical skills mentioned in the Technical Summary unless they were utilized in conjunction with academic or independent projects (in which case they should be described under those sections).
  • Education
    • List the specific degree awarded, the academic institution and preferably what year the degree was earned.
    • For people with only a few years work experience or advanced graduate degrees it may be beneficial to move the Education section to follow the Introductory Statement or Technical Skills Summary.
    • Ph.D. and Master’s Degree holders should also include the title of their Thesis and any advanced re

Guidelines for writing a business or management focused resume

  • Name and contact information
  • Career Summary
    • This section should define the key elements of your professional profile, career highlights, skills, capabilities. This brief paragraph should only contain a few sentences and gives the reader a ”snapshot” of who you are.
  • Summary of Qualifications or Achievements
    • Use this section to describe key strengths and achievements, such as quota numbers/revenues generated, business closed, partnership deals, funding raised, products launched, P&L responsibility, number of direct reports, problems solved, awards, etc.
    • For more technical management positions also make sure to list products, technologies and customer base.
  • Experience/Work History
    • Make sure to include dates of employment (for every employer), job title, name of employer and city/country of employment followed by a more descriptive summary of responsibilities, achievements and key duties.
    • For sales, technical marketing, business development and other customer facing types of management and executive positions, try to list the companies that you closed deals with/interfaced with and at what level (Director, VP, C-level, etc). This will give the prospective employer an idea of, not only your track record, but also what kind of network (rolodex) you bring to the table.
    • Make sure to explain in detail the highlights from your qualifications or achievements section above
  • Education
    • List the specific degree awarded, the academic institution and preferably what year the degree was earned.
    • Also list additional courses, trainings, certifications

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